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BORN IN 1953? WHAT ELSE HAPPENED?

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                           64th BIRTHDAY
   

1953_catalogues.jpg

SAMPLE  FROM MARCH, 1953

GIVE WOMEN A BREAK

Not all women were having fun with childbirth.  Letters from them kept popping up in the papers, asking for sensible changes to their status.  These did not indicate a widespread agitation for the “Liberation” that

was so earnestly sought in later decades, but it did signal that thoughtful writers were starting to push for deserved changes.

Letters, T J Ryan, Epping.  Reference to the fine achievement of Miss Jean Austin in gaining prizes for general proficiency in third-year law prompts the question, has not the time come when talented women lawyers should be raised to the Bench?

To regard this as absurd would itself be absurd, because the only reason against it would be their sex.  Legal knowledge and character alone qualify for the Bench, to which women would bring just as much legal learning and distinction as men.

Letters, Irene Connelly, vice-president, United Associations of Women.  T J Ryan poses a question often asked by visitors from countries where women Judges are a commonplace.

These visitors are equally amazed that rarely are our women barristers entrusted with briefs.

The answer that our association has always had to give to these questions has been that in Australia the highest qualifications are no match for prejudice.

In reply to the question: “Are we lacking in women who achieve distinction in their professions?” we can quote with justifiable pride such achievements as those of Miss Elizabeth Evatt and Miss Jean Austin.

In another column of the same issue the experiences of a woman doctor are related.  They tell a similar story of sex bias – of applications for positions received with eagerness until it is revealed that the applicant is a woman.

Only when Australia can be induced to relinquish its custom of calling only upon the talents of half of its people, and when appointments are made on the qualifications and not on the sex of the person, can we claim to be a true democracy.

Letters, Alice Murphy, Brighton-le-Sands.  Sydney is shabbily treated as regards the provision of public telephone booths.

I have lived in five suburbs but the position is always the same.  There may be three or four boxes in one district, widely scattered from one another.  Or, in the rare event of there being two together, you may be sure one is out of order.

Each box has its queue, which can overhear every word spoken by the hapless person using the instrument.  Quite often, overcome by the publicity, the impatient jingle of pennies, and the loud imprecations, I have come away from a box leaving my real reason for telephoning unspoken.  And it is just too preposterous for words to hope to make more than one call.  A person would have to be very thick-skinned to be so venturesome.

The general idea seems to be that women who use public phones are just wasting time chattering.  Why should they be regarded as nuisances if they do?  Housewives’ horizons are limited enough, goodness knows.  Why should it be considered so shocking if they spend some minutes on the phone talking to friends?


CONTENTS

JAN: SOME THOUGHTS FROM 1952  

PETS IN CHURCH

FEB: SAWTELL'S OPINION

THREE ARGUMENTS ABOUT WOOL

MAR:  PAINLESS CHILDBIRTH

GIVE WOMEN A BREAK

APR:  HOPE IN KOREA?  MAYBE

THE CORONATION IS COMING

MAY:  IT'S A BIG CIRCUS

OH NO!  THE CORONATION IS REALLY ON

JUNE:  ELIZABETH IS QUEEN

MAN AT THE TOP - EDMUND HILLARY

JULY: DOING IT TOUGH IN PRISON

ANOTHER DOSE OF THALLIUM

AUG:  PEACE IN KOREA AT LAST

POMMIES GOING HOME

SEP:  MY HOW THINGS CHANGE

THE REDEX TRIAL

OCT:  POLICE ON THE BEAT

LADDERS IN NYONS

NOV:  MELBOURNE CUP

COMPULSORY UNIONISM

DEC:  TWO OUTSTANDING STORIES  

SUMMING UP 1953

HOW TO BUY THESE BOOKS.  But first, note that if you want Express Post, you must make payment through eBay or by Direct (Bank) Deposit.

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EXTRA READING --  COMPLETELY OPTIONAL

   

YOU WILL NOT BE EXAMINED ON ANY OF THIS

ABOUT THIS SERIES   …  But after that, I realized that I really knew very little about these parents  of mine They had been born about the start of the Twentieth Century, and they died in 1970 and 1980. For their last 50 years, I was old enough to speak with a bit of sense.  I could have talked to them a lot about their lives. I could have found out about the times they lived in.  But I did not.  I know almost nothing about them really. Their courtship? Working in the pits? The Lock-out in the Depression? Losing their second child? Being dusted as a miner? The shootings at Rothbury? My uncles killed in the War? Love on the dole? There were hundreds, thousands of questions that I would now like to ask them.  But, alas, I can’t. It’s too late.

 

Thus, prompted by my guilt, I resolved to write these books. They describe happenings that affected people, real people.  The whole series is, to coin a modern phrase, designed to push the reader’s buttons, to make you remember and wonder at things  forgotten. The books might just let nostalgia see the light of day, so that oldies and youngies will talk about the past and re-discover a heritage otherwise forgotten. 

Hopefully, they will spark discussions between generations, and foster the asking and answering of questions that should not remain unanswered.

 

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